Burnet Woods

Burnet Woods

Burnet Features

This 90-acre park near the University of Cincinnati sports hiking trails, a fishing lake, a historic bandstand, playgrounds, shelters, picnic areas and a disc golf course. The Audubon Society named the park an Important Birding Area.
The park’s Trailside Nature Center, located next to the lake, has a nature library, crafts room, meeting space, exhibits and the Wolff Planetarium, which is the oldest planetarium west of the Allegheny Mountains. Twenty people can sit under its intimate dome to view the stars in all seasons and all latitudes. The planetarium may also be reserved for private functions or school groups.

Trails Side Nature Center

The Trailside Nature Center is located in Burnet Woods Park, adjoining the University of Cincinnati and one of Cincinnati’s oldest parks. It includes a children’s museum, a handicap-access meeting room for nature education programs and a fishing lake created in 1875.

The Wolff Planetarium

One of the best secrets of the Cincinnati Parks is the Wolff Planetarium located at the Trailside Nature Center in Burnet Woods. This Spitz model A-1 planetarium was purchased in 1950, and is the oldest planetarium west of the Allegheny Mountains. Twenty adults can sit under the twelve-foot dome to view the stars in all seasons and all latitudes. If you are going on a trip to the southern hemisphere or the Arctic Circle, we can even give you a preview of any stars you might see from Earth.

As well as being one of the oldest planetariums, the Wolff Planetarium may also be the most low-tech. There are no pre-recorded programs here. An experienced naturalist who knows diverse myths and obscure facts about the stars leads the journey through the stars. Audience participation is greatly encouraged and laughing at bad star jokes is required for admission. Always live! Always interactive! Always fun!
The Wolff Planetarium celebrated its 50th birthday in 2000. Located at the Trailside Nature Center in Burnet Woods, the Spitz A-1 planetarium was purchased in April 1950, and has been educating and entertaining the Cincinnati community ever since.
Attending a show at the Wolff Planetarium is a unique experience for children and adults of all ages. We enthusiastically maintain our claim as the lowest-tech planetarium in the universe. With maximum seating for 20, the atmosphere is intimate. All presentations are live and interactive – no boring recordings of Leonard Nimoy. And as always, audience participation, questions and laughing at bad star jokes are strongly encouraged.

2015 Fall Semester Pass: August 17, 2015 – December 27, 2015

2016 Spring Semester Pass:  December 28, 2015 – May 2, 2016

2016 Summer Semester Pass: May 3, 2016 – August 16, 2016

2015/2016 Annual Pass: August 17, 2015 – August 16, 2016

$175.00 for each Semester Pass

$425.00 for an Annual Pass

You can purchase a Burnet Woods Parking Pass at:

Cincinnati Park Board

Administration Building

950 Eden Park Drive

Cincinnati, OH 45202

Methods of Payment: Visa, Master Card or Cash. No Checks.

For additional information, please call 513-357-2604

Burnet Woods
3251 Brookline Ave.
Cincinnati, OH 45220

  • Picnic Area
  • Shelter
  • Bandstand/Amphitheater
  • Lake/Pond/Fountain
  • Disc Golf
  • Hiking Trail
  • Playground
  • Nature Center
  • Comfort Station/Restrooms
  • Significant Natural Areas
  • Historical Feature/Public Art

Burnet Woods(University Heights/Clifton)

Music Pavilion: Completed circa 1911, the gazebo-style music pavilion is the oldest structure in one of Cincinnati’s oldest parks (Burnet Woods became a park 1872). The gazebo is nearly identical to those in Washington Park (Over-The-Rhine) and Eden Park (Mt. Adams/Walnut Hills), and reflects the Mission style in its planar wall surfaces, stucco finish and red-tiled roof.

  • Trailside Nature Museum: This fieldstone building was completed in 1939, a combined project between the PWA and the CCC and designed by Freund. It reflects the influence of Frank Lloyd Wright with its horizontal design and rustic stone work. All external corners are rounded, as is the central chimney.
  • H. H. Richardson Monument: Reminiscent of Stonehenge, these 51 pink granite blocks (weighing a combined 84 tons!) were part of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce Building, which stood at Fourth and Vine streets downtown until gutted by a fire in 1911. These salvaged blocks were stored and rediscovered in 1967. Their placement in Burnet Woods, overlooking Martin Luther King Boulevard, is the result of a design competition sponsored by the University of Cincinnati’s architectural school. This winning design was submitted by Stephen Carter.